Sunday, May 6, 2012

Reading Readiness






One of the most important things that I learned while doing my Early Childhood degree was "If you can't hear it, you can't say it. If you can't say it, you can't read it. If you can't read it, you can't write it." Reading and writing is a process and it does not happen in a matter of few days, weeks, or months. In fact, it takes several years to build up our reading and writing skills. 


Here are some tips for you to use when planning to teach your child/student to read and write.




1. Read to your baby while she/he is in the mother's tummy! Research shows that the baby's hearing is very strong and is able to recognize the mother's and father's voice even in the womb. 





2. Provide your child with different types of books, even when they are young. Infants love touchy/feely books. This is a motivation for them to learn and become comfortable with books at an early age by using their senses to learn. Read to them! You can also provide foam letters and shapes to play with (yes, even while they are taking a bath!). 





3. As children become toddlers, they will start to say two-word phrases by the age of two. This is the time to use books to describe objects and pictures using the descriptive phrases so it is easier for them to catch on to. Rhyming is also the perfect way for children to have fun with words and further develop their interest in reading. Use magnetic letters and numbers to help them with identifying. Also go for a drive and talk about all the signs and billboards you see. Stretch out the sounds of the words and the letters. McDonalds is easy because the M is represented everywhere. Match the letters with the letters in your child's name.





4. Preschoolers will begin to have a strong independent role in choosing what books they would like to read. They like rhyming stories, funny stories, etc. Boys and girls begin to figure out what they like based on their interests (stereotypes begin here too if you notice). Boys will go towards books about cars and construction. Girls are geared towards fantasy and Dora, etc. Let them read what they like! Please do not discourage them from reading the same book a 100 times in the day if they want to. The one-time discouragement can be the downfall to their lack of interest in books.  



8 comments:

  1. Thanks for finding my blog! It is ALWAYS nice to have a face on the blog to follow and get to know. I have enjoyed reading several of your posts. Great tips and hints. I LOVE that you have posted on the side bar your current read. I am going to add that to mine as well AND to my school wiki page! Very cool idea. Looking forward to learning more from you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I found your blog on fuelmyblog and I absolutely love it. You have many great posts and I read them everyday since I found your blog. Thanks for your compliments. And feel free to share any of the stuff I post. I am looking forward to see what books you have read and are reading!

      Delete
  2. Very informative Page. Prenatal and early years learning is something I know very little about. Thanks for the info.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Good advice. I tell the parents in my daycare this all the time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Parents need to be reminded about this all the time. They need teachers like you and I to advocate for their children's growth and development. Keep up your good work!

      Delete
  4. Some children are ready to read while others are not. Literacy in the home is so important.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is 100% correct. Some children (mostly boys) are not early readers because of the differences in the brain of males vs. females. But when children are given many different types of reading material (like billboards/signs), they won't even consider it as "reading".

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...